AFTR

Address Family Transition Router

Address Family Transition Router (AFTR) is the latest product in ISC’s family of open source Internet infrastructure products.  Developed in concert with Comcast, AFTR 1.0 is intended to ease the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 by allowing legacy IPv4 end sites such as home PCs to interact with IPv4 content providers and services over an IPv6 carrier infrastructure. As with ISC’s other products, as the Dual Stack Lite protocol evolves, AFTR will strive to remain an up to date reference implementation as well as a robust enterprise grade router technology. Our ability to maintain AFTR and be actively involved in furthering core Internet protocols is directly dependent on community subsidy and participation.

About AFTR

AFTR is an implementation of an IPv4/IPv6 transition protocol based on Dual-Stack Lite, which is under development by several large ISPs within the IETF protocol standards development process.

Dual-Stack Lite is one of a family of technologies intended to ease the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 by allowing legacy IPv4 end sites such as home PCs to interact with IPv4 content providers and services over an IPv6 carrier infrastructure. This allows ISPs to deploy IPv6 as the last available IPv4 addresses are allocated, without requiring expensive, complex technology changes immediately for end users or server operators.

The initial version of AFTR consists of the code for a server that can give out either IPv4 or IPv6 addresses via DHCP, and tunnel via IPv6 to an arbitrary IPv4 endpoint elsewhere.

History of AFTR

The initial development of ISC’s AFTR was funded by Comcast over about 18 months in 2008 and 2009. However, AFTR was never intended for one carrier’s use or benefit. It is an open source implementation meant to promote the development of open standards for IPv4/IPv6 transition technology. We’re now inviting ISPs and enterprises- anyone who needs to grow a network beyond the end of the unallocated IPv4 address space – to join the AFTR community we’re building and help make Internet growth happen beyond the end of the IPv4 address pool.

ISC hosts two active public mailing lists, one for announcements and one for discussion related to ATFR and AFTR development. They are aftr-announce and aftr-users.

Click here to manage your subscription (subscribe or unsubscribe) to those lists (or any other ISC-hosted mailing lists).